Your Food and You: Heart Health Part 1 – Vitamin B1

Given that February is heart health month, let’s learn about the nutrients that help your heart and how to get them in food. This will be a three part series – Check back each day.

Vitamin B1 also known as Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin that should be consumed daily as there is minimal storage in the body. Thiamine’s role in the body:

  • Aids in converting carbohydrates and fats into a usable form of energy known as Adenosine triphosphate or ATP.
  • Essential for normal growth and development
  • Maintains the function of heart, nervous system and digestive system.

Not getting enough? Deficiency is rare because in North America most grain products are fortified with thiamine, however if you eat gluten free or organic products they are not always fortified. Early signs of deficiency include irritability, fatigue, weight loss, loss of appetite, aggressive behaviour. As it progresses one may experience never damage, elevates heart rate, nerviness. Some research has even link long term subclinical deficiency to Alzheimer’s and heart disease which may cause detrition of brain and heart tissues.

 

Who should consider a supplement?

  • People who abuse alcohol or recovering from dependency
  • People with Celiac disease or who do not consume processed gains
  • People with Schizophrenia and taking certain medication

If needing supplements a general B complex is ideal.

How much do you need?

Age Recommended Dietary allowance (mg)
Female Male
1-3 years 0.5 0.5
4-8 years 0.6 0.6
9-13 0.9 0.9
14-18 1.0 1.2
18+ 1.1 1.2
Upper Limit ND ND

How much is that in terms of food?

Food Serving size Vitamin (mg)
Meatless bacon/lunchmeat

Veggie Burger (Soy)

Ready to eat cereal

Instant oatmeal

Pork (cooked)-various cuts

All bran Buds

Soybeans, green (edamame), raw

Rice bran

Vegetarian stew/chili

Orange juice

Ground flaxseed

Sunflower seeds

Ham, cured

Duck/goose liver

Wheat germ

Lentils, raw

Tahini (sesame butter)

Macadamia nuts

2 tbsp Nutrition Yeast

Soy milk

Yellow fin (albacore) tuna

Beans, kidney / black

Soybeans dried roasted

Pasta

Peas, raw

Navy Beans

 

150g

1 Pattie (150g)

30g (~1/2 cup)

250mL (1 cup cooked)

75g

30g

125mL

20g

250mL (1 cup)

250mL (1 cup)

60mL (2 tbsp)

60mL (2 tbsp)

75g

90g

25g

40g (175mL)

60mL (2 tbsp)

60mL (2 tbsp)

60mL (2 tbsp)

250mL (1 cup)

75g

175mL

175mL

125mL (½ cup )

125mL (½ cup )

175mL

 

6.6mg

4 mg

0.5-1.5 mg

0.8-1.6 mg

0.6-1.1mg

0.7mg

0.6mg

0.6mg

1.8mg

1.0mg

0.7mg

0.5mg

0.5mg

0.5mg

0.5mg

0.45mg

0.45mg

0.41mg

0.4mg

0.38mg

0.37mg

0.36mg

0.36mg

0.33mg

0.32mg

0.32mg

 

 

How to get it:

Option 1 Options 2 Option 3
1 pack of instant oatmeal as part of a balanced breakfast 0.8 mg 1 cup snap peas

1/3 cup hummus with tahini at as snack

0.32mg

0.45mg

2 tbsp ground flax into your morning smoothie 0.7mg
½ a cup edamame beans with dinner 0.6 mg 75mg (2.6oz) of pork at dinner 0.6mg 2/3 cup of lentils (chickpeas)   on your lunch time salad 0.4mg
1.4mg 1.37mg 1.1mg

 

See examples of real food ways to get in your B vitamins here.
 

February 16, 2015
Revive Wellness