Your Food and You: Heart Health Part 2 – Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 also known as Pyridoxine is a water soluble vitamin that has many roles in the body including:

  • production of amino acids (protein)
  • production of insulin
  • Production of chemical messengers including histamine which is a chemical that sends messengers between nerves in the body.
  • Production of red blood cells called hemoglobin, oxygen caring molecule of red blood cells
  • Vitamin B6 also helps to reduce homocysteine levels (high blood levels the amino acid homocysteine may lead cardiovascular disease)
  • Required to convert tryptophan in to niacin (Vitamin B3)
  • Skin and immune health

Not getting enough? You may experience cracked lips, oily or flak skin, nausea and diarrhea. Sever deficiency may result in reduced or loss of appetite, depression, and confusion

Who should consider a supplement?

  • People who abuse alcohol
  • People who smoke
  • Women who use oral contractive
  • People who are taking medication for certain medication asthma, kidney disease, diabetes, sickle cell anemia or Hodgkin’s disease.
  • People who suffer from asthma, or PMS
  • People who exercise vigorously regularly

If needing supplements a general B complex is ideal as if B6 is taken alone you need to balance it out with higher amounts of other B vitamins, and magnesium.

 

How much do you need?

Age Recommended Dietary allowance (mg)
Female Male
1-3 years 0.5 0.5
4-8 years 0.6 0.6
9-13 1.0 1.0
14-18 1.2 1.3
18-70 1.3 1.3
70+ 1.5 1.7
Upper Limit 100 100

 

 

How much is that in terms of food?

Food Serving size Vitamin B6( mg )
Vegetarian stew/chili

Dried Ando pepper

Vegetarian Meat substitute

Game meat (Caribou, moose,seal,walrus)

Plain yogurt

Chickpeas

Turkey, cooked

Tuna, yellowfin or skipjack

Pork loin

Baked Potato skin on

Sunflower seeds

Chicken breast

Salmon baked or broiled

Pistachio , dishelmed

Nutritional Yeast

Mushroom, shiitake, dried

All bran buds

250mL (1 cup)

4 peppers

150g

90g

 

¾ cup 175mL

175mL

75g

75mg

90g

1 medium

60mL (2 tbsp)

75g

75g

¼ cup

60mL (2 tbsp)

10 mushrooms

¼ cup

2.9mg

2.4mg

2.4-1.6mg

1.7-1.2

 

1.6mg

0.8mg

0.8mg

0.7mg

0.7mg

0.6mg

0.5mg

0.5mg

0.4mg

0.4mg

0.3mg

0.5mg

1.3 mg

 

How to get it:

Option 1 Options 2 Option 3
75g (2.6oz) of Chicken in a pita a lunch 0.8 mg 1/3 cup all bran buds in your yogurt for snack 1.3mg 2 tbsp nutrition yeast popcorn or kale chip 0.3mg
Baked potato as your starch at dinner 0.5 mg ½ cup flavoured yogurt 1mg 2/3 cup of lentils (chickpeas)   on your lunch time salad 0.8mg
¾ cup plain yogurt on potatoes 1.6 ½ cup pistachio nuts 0.4mg
2.9mg 2.3mg 1.5mg

 

See examples of real food ways to get in your B vitamins here.

February 17, 2015
Revive Wellness